UK Finance Blogs – Why is the UK in the Stone Age When it Comes to Alternative Financial Media?

In the United States, online financial information and investing media has exploded in recent years. Where once there were just online replicas of offline newspaper/TV commentary and anonymous spam-ridden bulletin boards, there is now a proliferation of stimulating and diverse financial content written by both professional and amateur investors. These include professional blog sites (like Bill Cara, Big Picture, and The Kirk Report), aggregator sites like SeekingAlpha (who handpick articles from the world’s top market blogs and investment newsletters), expert investment communities like Covestor and Social Picks, crowd-sourcing sites like piqqem, to name just a few…

In contrast, despite London’s status as a financial hub, the online financial information and commentary scene in the United Kingdom still seems like a barren wasteland. There has been little apparent new development in recent years. Financial commentary is dominated by offline publishers like Bloomberg, Reuters and the Financial Times. To date, blogging has yet to become a big part of the UK investor scene. Most private investor discussion seems to be taking place on bulletin boards that would not have been out of place in the late 1990s and which don’t appear to have progressed much in terms of functionality in at least the last five years. Strangely, the web’s social networking phenomenon has barely touched the UK’s online financial sector.

This is surprising given that the data suggests that demand for alternative content in general is there – according to Hitwise, the market share of blogs is now greater in the UK than in the US: 1.09% vs. 0.73% of all traffic respectively as of May 2008. Over the last 3 years, UK Internet traffic to the Blogs and Personal Websites category increased by 208%, compared to 70% for News and Media generally. The recent success of political blog sites like Guido Fawkes suggests that there is interest amongst the British public in alternative media. The issue seems more to be around the supply of alternative finance content – there just do not seem to be many finance bloggers out there. This is paradoxical given the strength of UK financial services. The City of London has some of the smartest investors and analysts globally. However, their views remain directed through institutional channels (e.g. equity research) and their voices are apparently not being heard more broadly by the public on the Web.

To an extent, this reflects an apparent general reticence by the British to blog. In the States, the last five years have seen an explosion in alternative media, with vast numbers of independent commercial blogs, the most famous such examples being The Huffington Post, Engadget and Gawker Media. In contrast, the UK has been slower to adopt blogging with the same fervour – in the Guardian’s recent list of the top 50 global blogs, the UK performance was surprisingly weak given the bias towards English language content. The main UK appearances were Holy Moly (a celebrity blog – no. 27), the Offside (a football blog – no. 35) and the F word (a feminist blog – no. 41). A number of explanations have been offered for this dismal show. In a recent article, Shiny Media’s co-founder, Ashley Norris attributed the lack of UK blogs to a number of factors, namely:

1. The limited number of UK online eyeballs (and related difficulties in monetising non-UK ad inventory);
2. A lack of imagination in the UK ad industry (who prefer to work with established media brands or mega portals);
3. A lack of UK media entrepreneurs;
4. A lack of VC support (European VCs apparently don’t tend to be too interested in media unless it is supported by a technological innovation); and
5. Too much competition from established media (including the chilling influence of the omnipotent BBC).

In the UK financial information space, the most notable exception to this dearth of innovation has been the Financial Times’ Alphaville which launched as a live financial blog for market professionals in 2006. This has been a huge success but it is interesting that it took a traditional media outlet to really popularise blogging. Whether that says something about the British respect for authority is debatable but indeed, the other finance blogs with significant readership are all based around traditional media (The Economist’s blog, Interactive Investor’s blog, Robert Peston). There are of course some exceptions to this – Cash and Burn springs to mind or specialist media focused finance blogs like Media Money.

Even the FT’s Alphaville has remained a phenomenon largely contained within the confines of traditional media, given that professional FT journalists have been driving the content. Interestingly, in October, the FT launched a new forums feature on Alphaville called “The Long Room” – named after a bar in Throgmorton Street that was once a notorious hub of financial chatter. The Long Room is designed to allow finance professionals to set up their own discussions. This part of the site is however something of a “closed shop” for the City of London, because the Long Room registration process requires users to demonstrate their finance credentials and then be invited into the Room in order to view and/or contribute to the discussions. It is hard to ascertain whether creating a kind of Morton’s members club for the UK online financial community was intended to: a) wall off the content to prevent it cannibalising the main site, or b) introduce a quality filter to prevent the conversation deteriorating to the level of the UK private investor bulletin boards. While one can sympathise with the second objective, it does seem a shame given that the US experience is increasingly showing that, if the right filters are applied, then investors outside of the traditional financial community can be as, or even more, insightful than professional investors or market commentators.

Nevertheless, that gripe about exclusivity needs to be caveated with a recognition that, in terms of functionality, the Long Room is cutting edge in the UK scene and the Financial Times are to be applauded for innovating. It remains to be seen to what extent the Long Room represents the tip of the iceberg for UK financial blogging. Will the site lead to spin-offs as individual commentators develop their own online identities and followers?

Finance Blogs – How to Take Advantage of These Blogs

The topic of finance is a sensitive issue for anyone. There are very few people out there willing to talk about their finances especially when you are having financial problems. There are many ways to get information on how to manage your finances or tips on how to make more money. There are magazines and financial books available that can give you advice on various financial aspects. The Internet is another reliable and convenient option that has become a gateway for information on various topics.

You also have the advantage of being able to communicate with other users. This can be done in the form of a blog. You may want to share information on a particular subject and you also want feed back from other users. A web log has a platform for this and you can communicate with other people about a particular topic. You can create a personal blog that will let you exchange ideas with other like minded individuals while simultaneously earning you some good money.

The information on these sites is regarded as more opinionated than professional. So before you follow the advice to the letter ensure that you get professional advice. However, this does not mean that the information you gather here isn’t valuable. You should learn to use the finance web log as a guide on having some basic background information. You can also use a finance blog to get money from advertising, since this is a popular topic that many people want to share and comment.

In addition, the information found here is unbiased and accurate since there are many people who have shared their personal experiences and stories. This will be of great help to anyone going through financial problems get solutions. This is a great and easy way to give advice if you consider yourself qualified.

Personal Finance Blogs – Do They Make Sense?

What can personal finance blogs offer you?

Indeed, they provide people with a different way to understand the issue of their financial lives. For example, loans for bad credit, tips for frugal living, how to judge the finance market, etc.

What is the #1 problem that almost everyone has?

These issues can often be very confusing to people who have no previous experiences in this field. There are many of us who are not sure of what we should expect when we go to a bank and there is a stigma attached so that we do not always ask the questions we should.

Who are the most poor-informed people?

Students are especially caught in a difficult situation when it comes to personal corporate finance. Even in the best of economic circumstances, they are challenged with the thought of having to decide what they would like to do with the rest of their lives.

In addition, they are confronted with the serious problem of having to figure out how they are going to pay for it. Think about that fact that we are currently in a recession and it becomes very clear that they are facing greater hurdles than students from previous years have had to deal with.

So, how can they get help for free in such a situation?

If you said personal financial blogs, then you got it right. They act as a source of finance tips for young people and these are presented in a way that is easy to understand. It means that they are informed about the type of interest rates that are out there.

They can be given advice about certain banks and the conditions of loans. All of this means that they have more knowledge than they did at the start of the process and they are in a better position to speak with financial institutions.

How can these personal finance blogs of a great use?

While there are a number of loans for college students, they might not always know where to look for these. This is why financial websites are very important because they point them in the direction of banks and financial institutions that provide these services. They are also a great way of letting the reader know that it is likely to be more difficult to secure a loan than previously.

Given that there are some obstacles on the way, it is important to know that one can get a federal loan for college in case the banks are unable to help. This could mean that you would have to study in a particular industry but it presents a useful alternative.

So, when it comes to personal finance Google blogs, they do more than just help students with tips for saving money. They are a good source of information that students would otherwise not have and this means that they have a better chance of getting the type of loan that they really need.

What would be your duty now?

Now you have an idea how financial blogs can help you and it is your duty to find the one that fits to your interests. Check the most popular ones that are rich in comments. These comments will help you a lot and guide you to shorten your learning curve.

What would be my final significant tip for you?

In this context, I would like to advise you to be an active member in any online forum. This will help you to get to know more people and you can exchange your experiences with them. In addition, they can tell you exactly where to go and where to begin so that you can save time and effort.

Personal Finance Blogs

More and more personal finance blogs are popping up every day. Some discuss how they are going to make their first million dollars, others are about how to be frugal and save money, while others are more focused on paying down debt. It’s great to see such an interest in personal finance, and it’s fantastic to be able to be an observer and watch step-by-step how people take control of their financial situation.

One thing to conscious of as you read through personal finance blogs is that they are often not written by professionals in the field. In my opinion this has some strengths, as they are true accounts of strategies, products and systems that actually work for the author and it’s readers. But that also means it is even more important for you to do your due diligence before acting on any of the information given on these sites, as it should be regarded as opinion rather than professional advice.

That’s not to say there isn’t very valuable information that can be found within the pages of these personal finance blogs. Many have been listed in Money Magazine’s best personal finance websites, and listed in the New York Times and the like, so they do come with a level of credibility. Secondly, authors tend to do their very best at publishing accurate information in order to maintain their level of credibility and attract more readers.

The real gold, however, is often found deep in the comments section after each article found in the archives. Since most of these blogs allow anyone to leave a comment, it is not unusual to see people with competing views debate an issue, which is great for the readers. This is where you will often find certified professionals give their thoughts, argue points or include some additional background to help you make the most out of your financial situation. These comments allow you to see things from all angles so you can make the best decision based on the information at hand.

You probably don’t wan to let these personal finance blogs be a substitute for professional advice, but rather help guide you to a starting point and give you some general background information. Each person’s situation is slightly different, and what may work for one person may not work for everyone. However, the same fundamental concepts generally apply when working to pay down debt, manage money or accumulate wealth, so they are a great starting point.

Beyond that, you will often find honest personal finance software reviews, documents to help you stay organized, and general stories that will help you stay motivate and inspired to reach your goals.

With all of the personal finance bloggers out there, there is a wealth of information at your finger tips that can truly make you rich. Find the one’s you can relate to the most, and add them to your RSS feed. That way you can easily read through the new content on each site in one place, making it easy to read all of the fresh material.

Finance Blogs – 3 Ways You Can Make Money From Them

Nowadays most internet users are familiar with the concept of online blogs. Indeed a lot of people run their own blog, whether it’s a personal blog or a blog discussing a certain subject. However in this article I want to talk about the various different ways you can make money from a personal finance blog.

Personal finance is a classic example of a subject that is perfect for bloggers because there are endless different things you can talk about. For instance you can discuss budgeting, credit cards, loans, mortgages, pensions, property, saving, share trading, taxation, and so on.

Each of these subjects is potentially very profitable in it’s own way. The secret to success is to pick a subject that you are most passionate about and then decide which type of revenue model(s) you are going to use on your blog. You essentially have three different options.

Firstly you can sign up to Google AdSense or one of the other PPC programs. By doing so you will be able to place blocks of ads on your blog and earn money every time someone clicks on one of these ads. In the finance niche this can be highly profitable because there are times when you can easily earn several dollars per click.

The second option is to forget about these ad networks and sell advertising space yourself. This will often be significantly more profitable because by doing so you are keeping all of the advertising revenue yourself. Adopting this approach allows you to earn money in advance so you can therefore invest this money back into your blog in order to help it grow.

The final option is to use your blog to promote various different products and services as an affiliate. This is often seen as being the most profitable income-generating model because in the finance niche there are a wide range of different products and services to promote.

For instance you can promote stock brokers, Forex brokers, bank accounts, savings accounts, trading software, etc. You can even promote some of the premium training courses if you so wish which offer very high affiliate commissions in most cases, sometimes as much as 30-40% per sale.

So the point I want to get across is that there are many different ways you can earn a decent income from a financial blog. The trick is to build up your site and try and attract lots of visitors. This will help you to test out each method and determine which one is most likely to make the most money in the long run.